I Can’t Believe It’s Not – Gelatine!

By

Clarissa Kong

One does not simply go to a campfire without marshmallows. And just in case you don't sit well with gelatine, here a great D-I-Y for the gelatine-averse.

Read More

Gelatine sheets or Gelatine powder is mainly made up of collagen found in animal’s skin and bones such as pigs, beef and fish. It acts as a gelling agent and is often used in desserts such as panna cotta, custards and jellies.

Because of the components in gelatine, they are not suitable for vegetarians and vegans. But fear not, here’s one alternative that can produce the same tasty desserts with similar effects!

Agar is the most common vegan alternative for gelatine and it is used frequently in Asian desserts such as ‘kuehs’ (traditional Southeast Asian cakes) and fruit jellies.  They are extracted from a particular seaweed and comes in either flakes, powder or dried sheets like gelatine.

Besides the same use as gelatine, agar agar aids in digestion and are commonly used in fitness diets as it contains high content of fibre.

Talk about eating without having to feel guilty! Here is our fluffy strawberry marshmallow recipe using agar powder:

Ingredients

12.5g agar powder

90ml strawberry puree

150g sugar

90g water

150g glucose

 

Powder Mix

500g corn starch, 500g icing sugar

 

Instructions

  1. Bring strawberry puree to a boil and dissolve agar powder. Once agar powder has been incorporated properly into the mixture, place the liquid in a mixing bowl. Use a whisk attachment for this recipe.
  2. Boil glucose, water and sugar together until it reaches 116 degree Celsius. 
  3. Pour sugar syrup in a steady stream into the strawberry puree, with mixer running on low speed. Once all the sugar syrup has been fully incorporated, whisk on high until mixture has cooled down to room temperature or turn very sticky. This process usually takes about 10 -15 minutes.
  4. Prepare the the powder mix. In a flat tray, oil spray the surface and line with parchment paper. Sieve icing sugar and corn flour together onto the tray and make sure they are evenly mixed together.
  5. Transfer marshmallow mix into a piping bag with desired piping tip. We use a basic round tip for our testing. Pipe marshmallow into long ‘logs’ onto the powder mix tray. Make sure that the marshmallow logs are covered evenly with powder mix, including the top. Leave marshmallow to set overnight.
  6. Brush off the excess powder on the marshmallow and cut them into small pieces. Using a sieve, sift out any excess mix from the marshmallows before storing in an airtight container.

 

We hope you’re all ready to test out this chewy goodness!

Related Articles

Extreme Coffee Art

By

admin
Coffee – a booster for focus and inspiration. Some of the most creative minds in the history of humanity dabbled with this liquid amphetamine to push their imagination to the edge of insanity. When coffee and artistry come into play, expect more than just creating art on a white milk foam canvas. Here, we unearth the most unorthodox art using coffee, its essence and its entity.
1 / 14

Related Articles

Pop the Cork: La vie en Róse

By

Lu YaWen

Life is all good when you look through Róse-tinted glasses.

Read More

Search for the hashtag #rosé on Instagram and you’ll notice a pattern in the results: images of glasses filled with a pink hued liquid set against an exotic backdrop or sunset, mostly posted by women. The clear pageant winner of wines, rosé has largely been marketed as a ladies’ drink but should it be time men embrace the beauty of pink too?

For the most part, rosé is easier to drink; it has less tannins than a glass of red and is sweeter than a white. It’s made the same way all wines are except that the skins from the red grapes are left to ferment with the must (the mixture of pulp, seeds and stems) for only a short period of time. The few days or weeks of maceration allow a transfer of colour, just enough to give the liquid a stain of pale red.

Rosé has less tannins than a glass of red, and is sweeter than a white.

If you’ve had a sweet sparkling rosé and think you’ve seen it all, well, you’ve only skimmed the surface. Just going by the different shades you can find, there are kinds stained a deep pink to pale peach and everything in between. Every winery has its own unique method and grape variety, which fortunately gives us a myriad of flavours such as grapefruit, strawberry and watermelon in a dry, sweet or sparkling wine.

Sounds refreshing? When summer season rolls around and the weather gets hotter, it’s not surprising that people opt for this fruity, light wine chilled. Its friendly flavour profile also makes it great for pairing with most cuisines. The ancient Greeks and Romans were perhaps the first to figure this out when they were imbibing this clear pink beverage (any shade darker would have been considered unfit for consumption, ironically). Nowadays, you’ll also see rosé in slushie form, called a frosé, perfect for sunny day picnics or outdoor brunches.

Beyond the drink’s versatility, it has the superpower to inject festivity or romanticism into any activity. Bring out a bottle of rosé at a regular dinner and you’ll get confused table mates asking if there’s a special occasion. It’s a wine that demands a celebration even with leftovers. Hollywood celebrities such as Drew Barrymore and Sophia Coppola have also recognised the unique allure of rosé, and produce their own to sell. It’s high time both men and women enjoy the spoils of winemaking our predecessors indulged in since 4000BC.

Related Articles